Tag - Bootp Server

What features or restrictions can a DHCP server have

While the DHCP server protocol is designed to support dynamic management of IP addresses, there is nothing to stop someone from implementing a server that uses the DHCP protocol, but does not provide that kind of support. In particular, the maintainer of a BOOTP server-implementation might find it helpful to enhance their BOOTP server to allow DHCP clients that cannot speak “BOOTP” to retrieve statically defined addresses via DHCP. The following terminology has become common to describe three kinds of IP address allocation/management. These are independent “features”: a particular server can offer or not offer any of them:

  • Manual allocation: the server’s administrator creates a configuration for the server that includes the MAC address and IP address of each DHCP client that will be able to get an address: functionally equivalent to BOOTP though the protocol is incompatible.
  • Automatic allocation: the server’s administrator creates a configuration for the server that includes only IP addresses, which it gives out to clients. An IP address, once associated with a MAC address, is permanently associated with it until the server’s administrator intervenes.
  • Dynamic allocation: like automatic allocation except that the server will track leases and give IP addresses whose lease has expired to other DHCP clients.

Other features which a DHCP server may or may not have:

  • Support for BOOTP clients.
  • Support for the broadcast bit.
  • Administrator-settable lease times.
  • Administrator-settable lease times on manually allocated addresses.
  • Ability to limit what MAC addresses will be served with dynamic addresses.
  • Allows administrator to configure additional DHCP option-types.
  • Interaction with a DNS server. Note that there are a number of interactions that one might support and that a standard set & method is in the works.
  • Interaction with some other type of name server, e.g. NIS.
  • Allows manual allocation of two or more alternative IP numbers to a single MAC address, whose use depends upon the gateway address through which the request is relayed.
  • Ability to define the pool/pools of addresses that can be allocated dynamically. This is pretty obvious, though someone might have a server that forces the pool to be a whole subnet or network. Ideally, the server does not force such a pool to consist of contiguous IP addresses.
  • Ability to associate two or more dynamic address pools on separate IP networks (or subnets) with a single gateway address. This is the basic support for “secondary nets”, e.g. a router that is acting as a BOOTP relay for an interface which has addresses for more than one IP network or subnet.
  • Ability to configure groups of clients based upon client-supplied user and/or vendor class. Note: this is a feature that might be used to assign different client-groups on the same physical LAN to different logical subnets.
  • Administrator-settable T1/T2 lengths.
  • Interaction with another DHCP server. Note that there are a number of interactions that one might support and that a standard set & method is in the works.
  • Use of PING (ICMP Echo Request) to check an address prior to dynamically allocating it.
  • Server grace period on lease times.
  • Ability to force client(s) to get a new address rather than renew.

Following are some features related not to the functions that the server is capable of carrying out, but to the way that it is administered.

  • Ability to import files listing manually allocated addresses (as opposed to a system which requires you to type the entire configuration into its own input utility). Even better is the ability to make the server do this via a command that can be used in a script, rdist, rsh, etc.
  • Graphical administration.
  • Central administration of multiple servers.
  • Ability to import data in the format of legacy configurations, e.g. /etc/bootptab as used by the CMU BOOTP daemon.
  • Ability to make changes while the server is running and leases are being tracked, i.e. add or take away addressees from a pool, modify parameters.
  • Ability to make global modifications to parameters, i.e., that apply to all entries; or ability to make modifications to groups of ports or pools.
  • Maintenance of a lease audit trail, i.e. a log of the leases granted.

Back DHCP FAQ

DHCP Questions and Answers

27. Can a client have a home address and still float?
There is nothing in the protocol to keep a client that already has a leased or permanent IP number from getting a(nother) lease on a temporary basis on another subnet (i.e., for that laptop which is almost always in one office, but occasionally is plugged in in a conference room or class room). Thus it is left to the server implementation to support such a feature. I’ve heard that Microsoft’s NT-based server can do it.

28. How can I relay DHCP if my router does not support it?
A server on a net(subnet) can relay DHCP or BOOTP for that net. Microsoft has software to make Windows NT do this.

29. How do I migrate my site from BOOTP to DHCP?
I don’t have an answer for this, but will offer a little discussion. The answer depends a lot on what BOOTP server you are using and how you are maintaining it. If you depend heavily on BOOTP server software to support your existing clients, then the demand to support clients that support DHCP but not BOOTP presents you with problems. In general, you are faced with the choice:

Find a server that is administered like your BOOTP server only that also serves DHCP. For example, one popular BOOTP server, the CMU server, has been patched so that it will answer DHCP queries.
Run both a DHCP and a BOOTP server. It would be good if I could find out the gotcha’s of such a setup.
Adapt your site’s administration to one of the available DHCP/BOOTP servers.
Handle the non-BOOTP clients specially, e.g. turn off DHCP and configure them statically: not a good solution, but certainly one that can be done to handle the first few non-BOOTP clients at your site.
30. Can you limit which MAC addresses are allowed to roam?
Sites may choose to require central pre-configuration for all computers that will be able to acquire a dynamic address. A DHCP server could be designed to implement such a requirement, presumably as an option to the server administrator.

31. Is there an SNMP MIB for DHCP?
There is no standard MIB; creating one is on the list of possible activities of the DHCP working group. It is possible that some servers implement private MIBs.

32. What is DHCP Spoofing?
Ascend Pipeline ISDN routers (which attach Ethernets to ISDN lines) incorporate a feature that Ascend calls “DHCP spoofing” which is essentially a tiny server implementation that hands an IP address to a connecting Windows 95 computer, with the intention of giving it an IP number during its connection process.

Back DHCP FAQ

how can addresses be served on subnets other than the primary one

24. If a single LAN has more than one subnet number, how can addresses be served on subnets other than the primary one?

A single LAN might have more than one subnet number applicable to the same set of ports (broadcast domain). Typically, one subnet is designated as primary, the others as secondary. A site may find it necessary to support addresses on more than one subnet number associated with a single interface. DHCP’s scheme for handling this is that the server has to be configured with the necessary information and has to support such configuration & allocation. Here are four cases a server might have to handle:

Dynamic allocation supported on secondary subnet numbers on the LAN to which the server is attached.
Dynamic allocation supported on secondary subnet numbers on a LAN which is handled through a DHCP/BOOTP Relay. In this case, the DHCP/BOOTP Relay sends the server a gateway address associated with the primary subnet and the server must know what to do with it.
The other two cases are the same capabilities during manual allocation. It is possible that a particular server-implementation can handle some of these cases, but not all of them. See section below listing the capabilities of some servers.

25. If a physical LAN has more than one logical subnet, how can different groups of clients be allocated addresses on different subnets?
One way to do this is to preconfigure each client with information about what group it belongs to. A DHCP feature designed for this is the user class option. To do this, the client software must allow the user class option to be preconfigured and the server software must support its use to control which pool a client’s address is allocated from.

Back DHCP FAQ

Copyright ©2010 - 2021 Ciscoforall.com | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions

Porno Gratuit Porno Français Adulte XXX Brazzers Porn College Girls Film érotique Hard Porn Inceste Famille Porno Japonais Asiatique Jeunes Filles Porno Latin Brown Femmes Porn Mobile Porn Russe Porn Stars Porno Arabe Turc Porno caché Porno de qualité HD Porno Gratuit Porno Mature de Milf Porno Noir Regarder Porn Relations Lesbiennes Secrétaire de Bureau Porn Sexe en Groupe Sexe Gay Sexe Oral Vidéo Amateur Vidéo Anal